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    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Your Apple ID is used for iCloud, iCloud backups, logging into the App Store, making purchases, buying things from the Apple Store, and so much more. It’s a critical component of being an Apple customer and being in the Apple ecosystem, so you’ll want to be sure you have the proper email address configured and linked to your Apple ID. Rarely, some users may need to change the email address associated with their Apple ID, and this guide will walk through how to change the email address linked to an Apple ID.
    Note this is focusing on changing the email address associated with an existing Apple ID, it is not the same as changing the Apple ID on a deviceitself, which would mean using a completely different Apple ID. Instead, the same Apple ID is used but the email address is changed, for example if you change your email address permanently than this could be useful. If you aren’t sure what any of this means, don’t mess with any of the Apple ID settings. Similarly, if you have no reason to change the Apple ID email address, then don’t change it. 
    How to Change Email Address Associated with Apple ID
    This will change the email address used to login and use an Apple ID, iCloud, and related features. 



    Open a web browser on a Mac, iPad, iPhone, or Windows PC (use Safari if there any issues) Go to https://appleid.apple.com/, the official Apple ID management page and log in to your existing Apple ID* Choose the “Edit” option on the side of the Account area Now choose “Change Email Address” under the existing email associated with the Apple ID Enter the new email address you want to use and associate with the Apple ID in the [email protected] format, then click “Continue” Wait a moment or two for a verification email to arrive to the new email address, then enter that verification code into the box and choose “Verify” Click “Done” to save the changes * If you have it setup to use Apple ID 2-factor authentication you will need to verify a code before being able to login to the Apple ID website.
    Again, you are not changing the Apple ID itself that is logged into a device, it is simply changing the email address that is used for a specific Apple ID account. 
    Once you make this change then all future instances of logging into an iOS device, iPhone, iPad, Mac, iCloud, iTunes, or elsewhere will use the new email address you changed to. The old email address associated with the Apple ID will no longer work and no longer login, you must use the new linked email address to login in the future. 
    Only make this change if you must do so, it is not to be changed casually. If you change the email address associated with an Apple ID it will make any other device logged in with the prior email address (though the same ID) no longer function. Similarly, if you make the change and then forget your email or password associated with the account, you would have to follow steps to recover a forgotten Apple ID which is a nuisance at best. 
    Know of another option to change an Apple ID email address? Have an alternative approach to achieve the same effect? Let us know your thoughts in the comments. 
        from: http://osxdaily.com/2017/03/12/change-email-address-linked-apple-id/

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Have you ever wanted to know what every single possible terminal command was on a Mac? You can list every terminal command available by turning to the command line. What you’ll see is a significant list of terminal commands with over 1400 possible commands to investigate and use, many of which are either helpful or powerful as we regularly cover with our command line guides. Of course many of the commands listed will have no relevance to the average user, but it can still be helpful to be able to navigate through the list and investigate each command and its respective purpose.
    We’ll show you how to list every single terminal command available on a Mac, as well as how to get an explanation and details on each specific command that is shown.
     
    How to Show Every Terminal Command Available in Mac OS
    This trick will reveal every single possible terminal command available to Mac OS and Mac OS X. It works in all versions of Mac OS X system software as long as you are using the bash shell, which is the default in all modern releases.


    Open the Terminal app found in /Applications/Utilities/ At a fresh bash prompt, hit the Escape key twice You will see a message stating “Display all 1460 possibilities? (y or n)” type “y” key to start showing every command available Hit the Return key to scroll through the huge list of commands available Hit the “Delete” or backspace key to escape the command listing when finished You’ll see a truly exhaustive list of commands available, some of which may be familiar to advanced users and many commands which even pro users likely have never seen or used before. 
    Of course you’re now probably wondering what each command might do, or how to investigate what the shown commands do. That’s easy as well. 
    Getting Info & Explanation for Each Terminal Command
    You can easily retrieve information and an explanation on any of the shown commands by using the handy open man page trick, which will launch a manual for the chosen command into a new terminal window. Here’s how it works in the context of the all inclusive commands list on Mac OS:


    Right-click on any command listed you wish to investigate and explain further Choose “Open man page” The manual page for the selected command will open in a new terminal window to explain the command You can also use the Terminal app “Help” menu to quickly launch manual pages by searching for a specific command there. Additionally, if you want to find related commands or related instructions, you can use this trick to search manual pages for matches containing a specific keyword or command.
    The command line has literally thousands of commands available to use, if you’re interested in learning about specific terminal tricks be sure to read through out command line posts.
    from: http://osxdaily.com/2017/02/06/list-all-terminal-commands-mac/

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Many of you may use the excellent Picture-in-Picture mode on the Mac to watch a video or movie while doing something else on the computer. In doing so you have likely noticed that the Picture-in-Picture (PiP) windows snap into one of the four corners of the Mac display.
    But what if you want to move your Picture-in-Picture window somewhere else on the Mac screen?

    You can do that by holding down a keyboard key while attempting to move the window around.
    To locate the PiP window anywhere on the Mac display, simply hold down the Command key while dragging the Picture-in-Picture video player window elsewhere on the screen.
    As long as you are holding the Command key you can locate the PiP video window anywhere.
    To try this out yourself, open a Picture-in-Picture video playing as usual and then hold down the Command key as you drag and locate the PiP window where ever you’d like it to be.
    This should come in handy anytime you’re watching a PiP video on the Mac but the video player is blocking an interface component or some important data on the screen. 
        from: http://osxdaily.com/2016/12/19/move-picture-picture-video-window-anywhere-mac/

    fantomas
    Teaser Paragraph:
    The macOS Sierra 10.12.2 update improves the stability, compatibility, and performance of your Mac.
    This update:

    • Improves setup and reliability of Auto Unlock
    • Allows addition of a Chinese Trackpad Handwriting button to the Touch Bar Control Strip
    • Adds support for taking screenshots of the Touch Bar using the Grab app or Cmd-Shift-6 shortcut
    • Fixes an issue that caused the Touch Bar emoji picker to appear on the display
    • Resolves graphics issues on MacBook Pro (October 2016) computers
    • Fixes an issue where System Integrity Protection was disabled on some MacBook Pro (October 2016) computers
    • Improves setup and opt-out experience for iCloud Desktop and Documents
    • Fixes an issue with the delivery of Optimized Storage alerts
    • Improves audio quality when using Siri and FaceTime with Bluetooth headphones
    • Improves the stability of Photos when creating and ordering books
    • Fixes an issue where incoming Mail messages did not appear when using a Microsoft Exchange account
    • Fixes an issue that prevented installation of Safari Extensions downloaded outside the Safari Extensions Gallery
    • Adds support for new installations of Windows 8 and Windows 7 using Boot Camp on supported Macs
     
    Update
    Combo

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    OsxDaily Reports: Siri has the ability to read anything on the screen of an iPhone or iPad to you. And yes, that means Siri will quite literally read aloud whatever is open and on the display of an iOS device, whether it’s a web page, an article, an email, a text message, anything on the screen will be read out loud by Siri, and you’ll even have controls for speeding up and slowing down speech, as well as pausing and skipping sections
    From:http://osxdaily.com/2016/10/31/have-siri-read-screen-ios/
    To get the excellent Siri Speak Screen ability working on your iPad or iPhone, you will need to enable a little appreciated accessibility feature called speak screen, and then it’s just a matter of initiating the proper request with Siri.
     
    How to Have Siri Read Screen Text to You on iPhone, iPad
    First we’ll enable the Speak Screen feature and then use Siri to access it in iOS, here’s how it works:


    Open the ‘Settings’ app and go to ‘General’ and then to “Accessibility” Go to “Speech” and flip the switch for “Speak Screen” to the ON position Exit Settings Now from just about any screen in iOS, whether settings, a webpage, messages, email, summon Siri and say “Speak Screen” to have Siri read the screen and all screen contents to you Use the onscreen controls to stop reading or adjust the reading speed, section, or stop (or ask Siri to stop reading) For a practical example of how this can work, let’s imagine you have found a great article on the web and you’d like it read to you aloud. All you need to do is load up the web page in Safari (or another browser of iOS) and then summon Siri and say “Speak Screen” and Siri will start reading the text of the article to you. 
    Using the onscreen controls you can skip slow down Siri speech, skip backwards to a section to have it re-read, pause the speech, skip forward a section you don’t want read, or speed up the Siri voice reading. 
    This trick pairs really well with either the iPad or iPhone if you have the volume turned up enough to hear the reading out of the built-in speakers, but it also works wonderfully with headphones or speakers. Using this trick you could have Siri read you an article, an email, a web page, anything on screen, while you commute, or are out and about, or even just laying around.
    You can even use this trick with the Hey Siri voice activation feature, making it one of the better accessibility features available in iOS.
    Have any other screen speaking tips or ideas for how to use this great tip? Let us know in the comments.
     

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Rarely, the Mac App Store may report erroneous app download statuses or even offer a malformed file leading to an app that doesn’t launch or is partially downloaded. These situations are almost always the result of an interrupted or corrupted download, but can occur in some other scenarios as well.
    Sometimes simply deleting the app in question can resolve any surrounding difficultly, but on some occasions that isn’t possible or isn’t effective. These type of unusual errors can typically be resolved by manually clearing out the Mac App Store cache, and then re-downloading the app, or re-visiting the Mac App Store. This tutorial will walk through completing that process.
     
    Accessing the Mac App Store Temporary Download Caches
    Be sure to backup your Mac before beginning this process, it’s unlikely something will go wrong if you follow the instructions but because you are editing a system level cache directory it’s always good practice to backup and be sure your data is safe. Don’t skip backing up. 
    open $TMPDIR../C/com.apple.appstore/


    Quit out of the Mac App Store Open the Terminal, found in /Applications/Utilities/ and type the following command exactly: Hit Return and the com.apple.applestore folder will open in the Finder of Mac OS Move the contents of this folder onto the desktop of the Mac (or if you are confident, move the contained temporary data into the Trash) Importantly, do not delete or adjust any other files outside of this directory, when finished close the com.apple.applestore folder Relaunch Mac App Store Now you should be able to download or re-download the apps or Mac OS installer files again, and they should work properly as intended.
    This process can help if you’re unable to download something from the Mac App Store, if it’s showing up erroneously as downloaded when it’s not, or if there are constant verification errors or other problems with the downloaded app or installer file. For example, you may need to do this if you notice that the Mac App Store is persistently showing a Mac OS installer as “Downloaded” despite not having completed the download as discussed in this Sierra troubleshooting detail. If you delete the temp cache data, it will allow you to re-download that Mac OS installer again in such a situation. 
    This troubleshooting trick will not resolve user level cache issues with the App Store, which are typically superficial behavior like the App Store not loading pages or behaving in an inordinately slow manner. 
    For those wondering about alternatives that do not involve the command line, you can also approach this temp cache directory through the Mac App Store “Debug” menu, but the latest versions of Mac OS and Mac App Store do not seem to support the current defaults write command to reveal the option. If you happen to know an updated defaults string that works with modern Mac OS releases, be sure to leave a comment. 
        from: http://osxdaily.com/2016/10/08/mac-app-store-temp-cache-folder/

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:

    A feature added in macOS Sierra is handy for those who frequently switch among two languages while typing.

    Twitter buddy Michael Fessler alerted Mac 911 to a great help for those who frequently type in keyboards for two different character sets, like Latin and Hebrew, Chinese, Arabic, and many others. You can make a quick-switch option from the keyboard without resorting to a menu, by turning a tap of the Caps Lock key into a keyboard swap.
    The option appears in the Keyboard system preference pane in the Input Sources tab. It has a lot of explanation: “Use the Caps Lock key to switch to and from U.S. Press and hold to enable typing in all uppercase.”
      This won’t appear when you have two keyboards that use the same basic underlying set of characters. That may be confusing, because, for instance, you can add a French keyboard that uses a different layout, like AZERTY, and it’s not an option. Both the U.S. and French keyboards derive characters from the same Latin set.
    Pick a non-Latin keyboard, and the option appears. If you have multiple non-Latin keyboards, the first one you added is the only one that Caps Lock swaps between. If you add more and then delete the first or more, the most recently added or the last one remaining becomes the swappable keyboard.

    The Keyboard preference pane now lets you set a simpler way to swap for certain keyboards.
    This doesn’t work for all non-U.S. layouts, however. If you add Japanese, as my friend Matthew Amster-Burton did, the checkbox doesn’t appear. That’s because macOS’s default input method for Japanese is Hiragana, which relies on the underlying roman syllables, according to Matthew.
    You can seemingly predict this: if the keyboard preview in the preference pane shows Latin (or “Western”) characters, the keyboard option doesn’t appear; if the preview shows non-Latin characters, it does.
    from:  http://www.macworld.com/article/3123735/macs/how-to-use-cap-locks-in-macos-sierra-to-switch-between-keyboards-that-use-different-characters.html

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