Jump to content
  • Donation Goals

    Pay the bills

    Thanks to everyone who has donated, all donations go right back into making the site better!

     

    We used this to buy a better donation plugin so we will be able to set up donator rewards,  goals for new features and even premium support for that tosh that won't hack :)


    Donate Now

  • Articles

    Manage articles

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    If you spend a lot of time at the command line, you undoubtedly find yourself adjusting and editing text and commands, and you likely often need to move the cursor to a further position in the Terminal from where it’s actively located. Sure you can use the arrow keys to move left and right on a per-character basis, or you can use the handy put cursor at mouse position trick, but another option is to move the cursor position word by word in Terminal, skipping back or forward by entire word blocks rather than individual text characters.
    There are a few ways to achieve this, but the easiest which requires no modifications to the Terminal uses a longstanding series of two different keyboard shortcuts:
    Move Cursor Forward by Word in Terminal: Escape + F
    Escape F moves the cursor forward a word at the command line.
    Move Cursor Backward by Word in Terminal: Escape + B
    Escape B moves the cursor backward by a word at the command line.
    Moving forward and back word by word at the command line with these two keystrokes is demonstrated in the simple animated GIF below:

    These two keystrokes have been around at the command line for ages, and so though they certainly work to navigate by word block in the Mac OS X Terminal, they should also work in just about any other unix based terminal you come across as well.
    There are also two Mac OS specific keystrokes to navigate in text word by word forward and backward in Mac OS X Terminal and in most other Mac apps too:
    Option + Left Arrow Moves Cursor Left by a Word in Mac OS X Terminal 
    Option / ALT and the Left Arrow will also move the cursor position left by a word throughout Mac OS.
    Option + Right Arrow Moves Cursor Right by a Word in Mac Terminal
    Option / ALT and the Right Arrow will send the cursor position right by a word throughout Mac OS as well.
    Remember, the option key is the ALT key on Macs, and vice versa, though some models and regions will label them differently they are always the same key.

    You shouldn’t need to make any adjustments to terminal for the option tricks to work either, but if you find they are not working in Terminal app you may have better results with enabling Option as Meta key in Terminal for Mac.
    from: http://osxdaily.com/2016/07/14/move-cursor-word-by-word-terminal-mac/

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    The Recovery partition in Mac OS X is an important component of a system install in that it allows you to troubleshoot a computer, repair drives, restore from backups, and even reinstall Mac OS if need be. Nonetheless, in some specific situations you may find that a Mac does not have a Recovery partition, usually because it has either been unintentionally removed or because a drive was cloned and the Recovery partition wasn’t brought along in that duplication process.
    If you find yourself in a situation where a Mac is missing the bootable recovery drive partition, you can recreate the Recovery Partition in two different ways, as we’ll show you here.

    The first method of rebuilding a Recovery partition is to simply reinstall OS X onto the Mac, of course the obvious difficulty with that approach is that unless you use Internet Recovery mode or a USB installer, you can’t access the reinstall function. While using a bootable USB Mac OS X installer or Internet Recovery works just fine for those with good internet access or a separate install drive, another option is available as well by using a third party tool that is freely available on the web. That’s what we’re going to focus primarily on here, since the third party solution does not require the compete reinstallation of Mac OS X to repair and rebuild a Recovery partition onto a Mac.
    How to Create & Restore a Recovery Partition in Mac OS X
    Missing a Recovery partition? Here is how you can quickly re-create one on a Mac:

    Download a copy of the “Install OS X” or “Install Mac OS X” from the Mac App Store under the “Purchases” tab which matches the version of system software on your Mac (for example, the “Install OS X Mavericks” app, or “Install macOS Sierra” app) Go to the developers website here and download the latest version of Recovery Partition Creator, it’s an AppleScript that will handle the recreation of the recovery drive After the app has downloaded, right-click on “Recovery Partition Creator.app” and choose “Open” to bypass Gatekeeper Follow the onscreen instructions, and select the primary drive you want to restore a recovery partition onto (typically Macintosh HD unless you named the drive differently, or are using a separate disk) Point to the Mac OS X installer application you downloaded in the first step and let the AppleScript do it’s work When the Recovery Partition Creator app is finished running, reboot the Mac and hold down Command+R to boot into Recovery and confirm the recovery partition now exists and works as intended The recreated recovery partition is identical to one that comes with modern versions of Mac OS X to begin with, and it will offer full access to the restore, testing, and reinstalling features you would expect to see. 
    I had to run through this process recently on a Mac that had changed physical hard disks where the drive had been cloned first, which works great but routinely does not bring along the Recovery partition with that procedure. It doesn’t take too long to restore though, and it’s fairly straight forward process to rebuild the recovery drive again, so if you find yourself in a situation where the Recovery partition is missing or you (or someone else) have inadvertently removed that critical Recovery partition from a Mac, (or maybe intentionally deleted it too) just run through the above process to create a new one and restore that functionality again. 
    from : http://osxdaily.com/2016/07/03/recreate-recovery-partition-mac/
         

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    The next version of Mac system software is called macOS Sierra, it’s versioned as Mac OS X 10.12, and it will be available as a free download for all compatible Macs in the fall. Of course this begs the question, which Macs are compatible with macOS Sierra? What Mac hardware can run the new operating system and enjoy features like Siri, Continuity Clipboard, and more?
    If the Mac is fairly new it will certainly support macOS Sierra, but many older Macs are getting cut off from the compatibility list, including any Mac made before late 2009. That means many Macs that support the current versions of Mac OS X system software won’t be able to run MacOS Sierra at all, and instead will be stuck staying on an earlier software release.
    List of Macs Compatible with MacOS Sierra 10.12
    According to Apple, the official compatible hardware list of Macs capable of running Mac OS Sierra 10.12 is as follows:
    MacBook Pro (2010 and later) MacBook Air (2010 and later) Mac Mini (2010 and later) Mac Pro (2010 and later) MacBook (Late 2009 and later) iMac (Late 2009 and later) This list of supported Macs is offered directly from Apple, shown during the MacOS Sierra debut presentation at WWDC 2016 conference. The still from that presentation is shown below with the same compatibility list:

    How to Check Your Mac for MacOS Sierra Compatibility
    The simplest way to determine if your Mac is compatible with MacOS Sierra is to check the model make and model year, here is how to do that:
    Open the  Apple menu in the upper left corner and choose “About This Mac” From the “Overview” tab, look under the current system software version and for the computer model and year
    If the Mac is the same or a later model year than what is shown in the macOS Sierra compatibility list above, the Mac is compatible with 10.12. 
    You may notice the compatibility list for MacOS Sierra 10.12 is a little curious because some of the Macs that are incompatible have better hardware than some of the hardware that is included in the compatible list. It’s unclear why this is, but this does suggest that support for MacOS Sierra is not just a matter of hardware specs alone, as the minimum system requirements for macOS Sierra are not clearly defined by minimum CPU type or speed, RAM, GPU, or disk capacity. That makes macOS Sierra a little unusual compared to some of the other Mac OS X releases from years past, but as time goes on we may get a clearer picture as to why this is.
    Developers can download MacOS Sierra right now from the App Store and developer center, whereas the general public will have to wait until the fall to get their hands on the final version. 
    Of course it’s not just MacOS that is getting an update this fall, and for mobile users, you can check the iOS 10 compatibility list of supported iPhone and iPad models too.
    from: http://osxdaily.com/2016/06/14/macos-sierra-compatibility-list/
         

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Early next week Apple will detail its latest software advancements at WWDC 2016. Apple’s updated mobile operating system, desktop operating system, watchOS and tvOS are going to be the stars of the show, with the mobile and Mac software updates being the top announcements fans are expecting. There have been plenty of rumors detailing the expected features of the next versions of iOS and OS X, though Apple has yet to confirm any of them. But what Apple has inadvertently confirmed, for the second time now, is a major change coming to the Mac.
    You’ve known it as Mac OS X or OS X for years, but that’s about to change in 2016. Apple will replace OS X with “MacOS” or “macOS,” which would be more in line with its software naming scheme. iOS, macOS, watchOS and tvOS rolls off the tongue a lot easier than having “OS X” inserted anywhere in that enumeration.
    In a support document related to its early WWDC announcement on Wednesday, Apple let the “macOS” name slip for the second time, MacRumors reports. The new name was spotted in documentation detailing the new revenue split for subscription-based apps, as seen in the following screenshot.

    Apple quickly fixed the error, replacing “macOS” with OS X. But at this point it seems pretty clear that a name change is due. Earlier this year, Apple used the new macOS name in an environmental website update. At the time, the company quickly changed its “MacOS” reference – with a capital M – to OS X after it was discovered.
    from:
    http://bgr.com/2016/06/09/apple-macos-os-x-name-update/

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Have you ever wanted to have a web site or web page used as a screen saver on Mac OS X? Well you can do exactly that with the help of a free screensaver called WebViewScreenSaver, which allows Mac users to add URLs to serve as the content of a screen saver whenever it’s activated on the Mac. This is handy for a variety of obvious reasons, and it’s quite easy to setup.
    You can use any URL, site, or web page, and you can even reference a remote list of URLs if desired. 

    Get the WebViewScreenSaver here Once it has finished downloading, right-click and choose “Open” to bypass Gatekeeper and install the screen saver (or install the screen saver manually) Open System Preferences and go to “Display & Screen Saver” settings, and under the Screen Saver tab locate and select the newly installed WebViewScreenSaver Choose “Screen Saver Options” and use “Add URL” button to add a website address to the screen saver, you can change the URL by selecting it from the address list then hitting the Return key, (go ahead and add http://osxdaily.com of course) Close the screen saver and enjoy your new website screen saver You can use multiple sites if you want to cycle through them, or just a single web site if you want to view one particular web page in particular. 
    Once you activate the screen saver, the web page(s) chosen are embedded in webview in the screen saver, surrounded by a black border.

    The screensaver works with any website but it’s perhaps most appropriate for the type of sites you visit often, whether thats the magnificent osxdaily.com, a news site, hobbiest forum, some fancy HTML5 animation, or something you create exclusively for the purpose of using as a screen saver.
    from:http://osxdaily.com/2016/06/05/web-site-as-screen-saver-mac/

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Mac OS X defaults to a predefined set system font size for all onscreen text and user interface elements, and while many users will find the default text size to be sufficient, some users may wish the system font size was larger, and some may wish the Mac system text size was smaller. It turns out that OS X may not offer a method of directly changing all system fonts, but instead Mac users can adjust their screen to increase or decrease the size of the system font, onscreen text, and everything else seen on screen as well.
    To change the system text size this way, we’ll be changing the screen resolution of the Mac display itself. In some cases, this may mean running on a non-native scaled resolution, which tends to look best on Retina displays. There’s a trade-off with this approach in that you lose or gain screen real estate (space for windows and stuff on the display) in order to increase or decrease the size of text and interface elements. The example images below will help to show this, but it’s better experienced yourself on your own Mac and display.
    How to Increase Screen Element & Text Size in Mac OS X
    This will increase the size of all onscreen fonts and interface elements by using a different display resolution, it’s slightly different for Retina displays and non-Retina displays, we’ll cover both:
    Go to the  Apple menu and choose “System Preferences” Go to the “Display” preference panel, then to the “Display” tab

    For Retina Display Macs: Next to the “Resolution” section, choose “Scaled” Select “Larger Text” from the options available, you will see a pop-up message saying “Are you sure you want to switch to this scaled resolution? When using this scaled resolution, some applications may not fit entirely on screen.” so choose “OK” to confirm that you wish to use the larger text size scaled resolution For Non-Retina Macs & External Displays: Next to the “Resolution” section, choose “Scaled” Select a smaller screen resolution from the list of available resolutions, this may include 1080p, 1080i, 720p, 480p, or direct resolutions like 1600 x 900, 1024 x 768, 800 x 600, 640 x 480 – to make the onscreen text size and other onscreen elements larger aim for a smaller number, such as 720p or 1024×768 When satisfied with the size of the onscreen element size, font size, and text size, close out of System Preferences and use the Mac as usual The “Larger Text” option for Retina displays is similar to 1024×768 on a non-Retina display, and will dramatically increase the size of onscreen text and interface elements for most Mac laptops like the MacBook and MacBook Pro, as well as iMac and other high resolution displays. Setting the screen resolution to 1024×768 or larger on a non-Retina display will also dramatically increase the size of onscreen fonts and interface elements. 
    The animated GIF below demonstrates the four Retina settings being cycled between, with Larger Text being the first and displaying as the biggest of the group.

    The Larger Text scaled display resolution option is great for users who have difficulty reading or interacting with onscreen elements with MacBook Pro and iMac displays, but it’s also incredibly helpful to use when any Mac is connected to a TV screen and viewed at a distance, since elements and interactions will be larger and easier to read at the larger size. 
    The other sizes, such as “More Space”, allow for considerably more screen real estate but at the expense of much smaller fonts and interactive interface elements. This trade-off largely depends on the user. 
    What do the Scaled Display Sizes Look Like?
    You really need to use the different resolutions on the individual Mac yourself to get the best idea possible of how things will look on the individual screen, but the images below will give you a general idea of how large or small various items will appear on a display. As you can see, the font and text sizes change as well as the size of everything else on screen, including buttons, icons, windows, menu bars, title bars, literally the size of everything on screen is impacted by adjusting and scaling resolutions this way:
    Mac OS X set to display “Larger Text”

    Mac OS X set to display size “Default”

    Mac OS X set to display in-between scale size of text / space

    Mac OS X set to display as “More Space”

    For Macs with secondary screens or an external display, you can show all possible display resolutions for an external screen to reveal other screen resolutions which may otherwise be hidden from the OS X default options. 
    Some may consider this a workaround, but aside from individually adjusting the font size in various applications, this is the only way to universally impact all onscreen text and font sizes on the Mac. It’s possible Apple will introduce greater text size and font size controls in future versions of OS X, but in the meantime, adjusting the screen resolution is the only way to universally change the size of things seen on the display of any Mac. 
    from: http://osxdaily.com/2016/05/23/increase-system-text-size-mac-os-x-scaled-resolution/
     

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Have you ever wished the wallpaper on your Mac was animated? One common trick to achieve that effect is to set a screen saver as the desktop wallpaper in Mac OS X, which looks great but can wind up using a fair amount of processor to display the animations, but now another option is available; use an animated GIF as desktop wallpaper on the Mac instead, thanks to a little free app called GifPaper.
    GIFPaper is somewhat experimental at this point, requires skipping Gatekeeper, uses about 15% of CPU to display the animation, requires manually installing a preference panel, and if you want to get rid of it, you have to force quit the associated process through Activity Monitor. Because of all that, using GifPaper is likely better used exclusively by more advanced Mac users, as it’s totally unsupported by the developer (or anyone else). If you aren’t comfortable with any of that, don’t use the GifPaper app for now. If you don’t mind those caveats, here’s how you can use GIFPaper to set an animated GIF as the desktop picture on a Mac.
    How to Set Animated GIF as Desktop Wallpaper in Mac OS X

    Get GIFPaper from this Dropbox link*, it’s free from the developer but unsupported Install the preference panel and use the Browse option to select your animated GIF, then adjust the settings as desired The animated GIF should load as wallpaper immediately, but if it doesn’t try manually launching the Gifpaper.app to load the gif as the desktop background picture Here’s an example of the Mac desktop with a fireplace GIF in use as the wallpaper background image:

    And here’s another Mac desktop example with animated GIF as wallpaper via Lifehacker:

    This can be a fun use for your Live Photos converted to GIFs, which is what I have done in this piece with a fireplace gif that was created from a Live Photo. Of course if you have Gif Brewerythan you can use other masterful animated GIF creations of your own doing as well, otherwise a quick Google Image search for “animated gif (item)” or visit to a site like Giphy should find you something to meet your GIF needs.
    * Download and use this app at your own discretion, currently there is no associated developer page or Github page about the GifPaper app. Generally speaking it is unwise to download and use apps or files from random web links from an unidentified developer, but this app was found by LifeHacker and it works as advertised (the creepy blinking eyes gif via 2001 (the movie) shown on page is from Lifehacker too).
    Removing GIF Paper and getting the regular wallpaper back again
    You can remove the GifPaper preference panel with a right-click:

    And if you want to end the animated GIF as your wallpaper, either reboot the Mac, or quit the Gif Paper process running through Activity Monitor:

    Unfortunately there isn’t a Github page with source or an official site for the project, though the developer Tomasz Wojcik mentions they’d likely put it on Github eventually. If you were hoping to get a look at the source, get support for the app, or ask questions specifically about the project or how it works, you’ll have to reach out to the creator directly via the readme file attached to the download, for now anyway.
    from: http://osxdaily.com/2016/05/21/use-animated-gif-wallpaper-mac-os-x-gifpaper/

×