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    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Early next week Apple will detail its latest software advancements at WWDC 2016. Apple’s updated mobile operating system, desktop operating system, watchOS and tvOS are going to be the stars of the show, with the mobile and Mac software updates being the top announcements fans are expecting. There have been plenty of rumors detailing the expected features of the next versions of iOS and OS X, though Apple has yet to confirm any of them. But what Apple has inadvertently confirmed, for the second time now, is a major change coming to the Mac.
    You’ve known it as Mac OS X or OS X for years, but that’s about to change in 2016. Apple will replace OS X with “MacOS” or “macOS,” which would be more in line with its software naming scheme. iOS, macOS, watchOS and tvOS rolls off the tongue a lot easier than having “OS X” inserted anywhere in that enumeration.
    In a support document related to its early WWDC announcement on Wednesday, Apple let the “macOS” name slip for the second time, MacRumors reports. The new name was spotted in documentation detailing the new revenue split for subscription-based apps, as seen in the following screenshot.

    Apple quickly fixed the error, replacing “macOS” with OS X. But at this point it seems pretty clear that a name change is due. Earlier this year, Apple used the new macOS name in an environmental website update. At the time, the company quickly changed its “MacOS” reference – with a capital M – to OS X after it was discovered.
    from:
    http://bgr.com/2016/06/09/apple-macos-os-x-name-update/

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Have you ever wanted to have a web site or web page used as a screen saver on Mac OS X? Well you can do exactly that with the help of a free screensaver called WebViewScreenSaver, which allows Mac users to add URLs to serve as the content of a screen saver whenever it’s activated on the Mac. This is handy for a variety of obvious reasons, and it’s quite easy to setup.
    You can use any URL, site, or web page, and you can even reference a remote list of URLs if desired. 

    Get the WebViewScreenSaver here Once it has finished downloading, right-click and choose “Open” to bypass Gatekeeper and install the screen saver (or install the screen saver manually) Open System Preferences and go to “Display & Screen Saver” settings, and under the Screen Saver tab locate and select the newly installed WebViewScreenSaver Choose “Screen Saver Options” and use “Add URL” button to add a website address to the screen saver, you can change the URL by selecting it from the address list then hitting the Return key, (go ahead and add http://osxdaily.com of course) Close the screen saver and enjoy your new website screen saver You can use multiple sites if you want to cycle through them, or just a single web site if you want to view one particular web page in particular. 
    Once you activate the screen saver, the web page(s) chosen are embedded in webview in the screen saver, surrounded by a black border.

    The screensaver works with any website but it’s perhaps most appropriate for the type of sites you visit often, whether thats the magnificent osxdaily.com, a news site, hobbiest forum, some fancy HTML5 animation, or something you create exclusively for the purpose of using as a screen saver.
    from:http://osxdaily.com/2016/06/05/web-site-as-screen-saver-mac/

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Mac OS X defaults to a predefined set system font size for all onscreen text and user interface elements, and while many users will find the default text size to be sufficient, some users may wish the system font size was larger, and some may wish the Mac system text size was smaller. It turns out that OS X may not offer a method of directly changing all system fonts, but instead Mac users can adjust their screen to increase or decrease the size of the system font, onscreen text, and everything else seen on screen as well.
    To change the system text size this way, we’ll be changing the screen resolution of the Mac display itself. In some cases, this may mean running on a non-native scaled resolution, which tends to look best on Retina displays. There’s a trade-off with this approach in that you lose or gain screen real estate (space for windows and stuff on the display) in order to increase or decrease the size of text and interface elements. The example images below will help to show this, but it’s better experienced yourself on your own Mac and display.
    How to Increase Screen Element & Text Size in Mac OS X
    This will increase the size of all onscreen fonts and interface elements by using a different display resolution, it’s slightly different for Retina displays and non-Retina displays, we’ll cover both:
    Go to the  Apple menu and choose “System Preferences” Go to the “Display” preference panel, then to the “Display” tab

    For Retina Display Macs: Next to the “Resolution” section, choose “Scaled” Select “Larger Text” from the options available, you will see a pop-up message saying “Are you sure you want to switch to this scaled resolution? When using this scaled resolution, some applications may not fit entirely on screen.” so choose “OK” to confirm that you wish to use the larger text size scaled resolution For Non-Retina Macs & External Displays: Next to the “Resolution” section, choose “Scaled” Select a smaller screen resolution from the list of available resolutions, this may include 1080p, 1080i, 720p, 480p, or direct resolutions like 1600 x 900, 1024 x 768, 800 x 600, 640 x 480 – to make the onscreen text size and other onscreen elements larger aim for a smaller number, such as 720p or 1024×768 When satisfied with the size of the onscreen element size, font size, and text size, close out of System Preferences and use the Mac as usual The “Larger Text” option for Retina displays is similar to 1024×768 on a non-Retina display, and will dramatically increase the size of onscreen text and interface elements for most Mac laptops like the MacBook and MacBook Pro, as well as iMac and other high resolution displays. Setting the screen resolution to 1024×768 or larger on a non-Retina display will also dramatically increase the size of onscreen fonts and interface elements. 
    The animated GIF below demonstrates the four Retina settings being cycled between, with Larger Text being the first and displaying as the biggest of the group.

    The Larger Text scaled display resolution option is great for users who have difficulty reading or interacting with onscreen elements with MacBook Pro and iMac displays, but it’s also incredibly helpful to use when any Mac is connected to a TV screen and viewed at a distance, since elements and interactions will be larger and easier to read at the larger size. 
    The other sizes, such as “More Space”, allow for considerably more screen real estate but at the expense of much smaller fonts and interactive interface elements. This trade-off largely depends on the user. 
    What do the Scaled Display Sizes Look Like?
    You really need to use the different resolutions on the individual Mac yourself to get the best idea possible of how things will look on the individual screen, but the images below will give you a general idea of how large or small various items will appear on a display. As you can see, the font and text sizes change as well as the size of everything else on screen, including buttons, icons, windows, menu bars, title bars, literally the size of everything on screen is impacted by adjusting and scaling resolutions this way:
    Mac OS X set to display “Larger Text”

    Mac OS X set to display size “Default”

    Mac OS X set to display in-between scale size of text / space

    Mac OS X set to display as “More Space”

    For Macs with secondary screens or an external display, you can show all possible display resolutions for an external screen to reveal other screen resolutions which may otherwise be hidden from the OS X default options. 
    Some may consider this a workaround, but aside from individually adjusting the font size in various applications, this is the only way to universally impact all onscreen text and font sizes on the Mac. It’s possible Apple will introduce greater text size and font size controls in future versions of OS X, but in the meantime, adjusting the screen resolution is the only way to universally change the size of things seen on the display of any Mac. 
    from: http://osxdaily.com/2016/05/23/increase-system-text-size-mac-os-x-scaled-resolution/
     

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Have you ever wished the wallpaper on your Mac was animated? One common trick to achieve that effect is to set a screen saver as the desktop wallpaper in Mac OS X, which looks great but can wind up using a fair amount of processor to display the animations, but now another option is available; use an animated GIF as desktop wallpaper on the Mac instead, thanks to a little free app called GifPaper.
    GIFPaper is somewhat experimental at this point, requires skipping Gatekeeper, uses about 15% of CPU to display the animation, requires manually installing a preference panel, and if you want to get rid of it, you have to force quit the associated process through Activity Monitor. Because of all that, using GifPaper is likely better used exclusively by more advanced Mac users, as it’s totally unsupported by the developer (or anyone else). If you aren’t comfortable with any of that, don’t use the GifPaper app for now. If you don’t mind those caveats, here’s how you can use GIFPaper to set an animated GIF as the desktop picture on a Mac.
    How to Set Animated GIF as Desktop Wallpaper in Mac OS X

    Get GIFPaper from this Dropbox link*, it’s free from the developer but unsupported Install the preference panel and use the Browse option to select your animated GIF, then adjust the settings as desired The animated GIF should load as wallpaper immediately, but if it doesn’t try manually launching the Gifpaper.app to load the gif as the desktop background picture Here’s an example of the Mac desktop with a fireplace GIF in use as the wallpaper background image:

    And here’s another Mac desktop example with animated GIF as wallpaper via Lifehacker:

    This can be a fun use for your Live Photos converted to GIFs, which is what I have done in this piece with a fireplace gif that was created from a Live Photo. Of course if you have Gif Brewerythan you can use other masterful animated GIF creations of your own doing as well, otherwise a quick Google Image search for “animated gif (item)” or visit to a site like Giphy should find you something to meet your GIF needs.
    * Download and use this app at your own discretion, currently there is no associated developer page or Github page about the GifPaper app. Generally speaking it is unwise to download and use apps or files from random web links from an unidentified developer, but this app was found by LifeHacker and it works as advertised (the creepy blinking eyes gif via 2001 (the movie) shown on page is from Lifehacker too).
    Removing GIF Paper and getting the regular wallpaper back again
    You can remove the GifPaper preference panel with a right-click:

    And if you want to end the animated GIF as your wallpaper, either reboot the Mac, or quit the Gif Paper process running through Activity Monitor:

    Unfortunately there isn’t a Github page with source or an official site for the project, though the developer Tomasz Wojcik mentions they’d likely put it on Github eventually. If you were hoping to get a look at the source, get support for the app, or ask questions specifically about the project or how it works, you’ll have to reach out to the creator directly via the readme file attached to the download, for now anyway.
    from: http://osxdaily.com/2016/05/21/use-animated-gif-wallpaper-mac-os-x-gifpaper/

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    Remember when you first started using a web browser, how great it was to be able to save bookmarks? It was necessary back in the day, because you couldn’t remember all those URLs, and browsers didn’t auto-complete with addresses of your saved sites. They also didn’t suggest sites when you typed the name of a company or publication, so you needed to know the URL to get where you wanted.
    But the more bookmarks you save, the harder it is to find what you’re looking for. Remember that site where you saw that really interesting article last month? You bookmarked it, and you remember the title, but if you look in your Safari bookmarks, you have to either scan the entire list, or search for it. Sure, you can sort bookmarks in folders, but who has the time to do that? And you’d only do that for the sites you visit very often.
    Wouldn’t it be great if you could sort bookmarks alphabetically in Safari? There has never been a way to do this in Safari itself, but there is a way, one that’s been around for donkeys’ years. The process is slightly different now.
    Start by displaying your bookmarks in Safari (Bookmarks > Show Bookmarks). Click the Edit button at the bottom of the list.
    Edit your Safari bookmarks to be able to drag them to the Finder.
    Drag them all to a folder in the Finder; make sure you don’t select Bookmarks Menu, or you won’t be able to drag the bookmarks. Display that folder in List view (View > As List, in the Finder), and then click the Name header to sort the files by name.
    Next, move up a level in the Finder (press Command-up-arrow), and drag that folder onto the bookmark list in Safari. All your bookmarks will be added to the Bookmarks list, in that folder, You can delete the originals, then move the bookmarks out of the folder to the Bookmarks Menu, or to your Favorites. This is a lot of work for something that should be pretty simple.
    You can do this easily in other browsers. For example, in Chrome, if you display your bookmarks and click the Organize menu, you can easily sort them alphabetically (Reorder by title).
    Chrome lets you sort bookmarks alphabetically.
    And Firefox gives you a plethora of sort options:
      Firefox gives you lots of sort options for your bookmarks.
    Fortunately, there’s an app for this: the free SafariSort, which can sort your bookmarks alphabetically, or in alphabetical order with all your bookmark folders on top of the list. It’s fast and simple, and if you like having bookmarks in order, you can run it regularly.
    SafariSort is a simple app that sorts your bookmarks alphabetically.
    Wanting to sort bookmarks alphabetically doesn’t seem like an odd feature request; it’s actually a great way to cull duplicate bookmarks. In fact, Apple should allow Safari to display bookmarks in date order as well. If you add bookmarks to folders, you won’t see all your bookmarks by date, and having a full list in order can be a good way to find what you’re looking for.
    No matter what, it would be nice if Safari offered some more ways to view bookmarks, as other browsers do.
    from: http://www.macworld.com/article/3072216/browsers/why-cant-safari-sort-bookmarks-alphabetically.html

    fantomas

    OS X 10.11.5 is out!

    By fantomas, in News,

    Teaser Paragraph:
    Apple released the fifth update for OS X El Capitan.
    The OS X El Capitan 10.11.5 update improves the stability, compatibility and security of your Mac, and is recommended for all El Capitan users.

    Update
    Combo

    c.frio
    Teaser Paragraph:
    When OS X won't let you unmount a flash drive or external hard drive, here's what you can do the drive won’t unmount no matter what, and I get the dreaded “The disk wasn’t ejected because one or more programs may be using it” or “The volume cannot be ejected because it’s currently in use” messages.
    He’s had this happen routinely with a Mac mini using flash drives and external hard disk drives (HDDs). I’ve definitely seen some of this behavior, though it’s not routine. If OS X “understands” why it can’t unmount a drive, starting a few releases ago, it will tell you. But the dialogs Kurt is seeing aren’t the informative kind that tell you which app is involved.
    Folks across the Internet seem to have connected the rise of this issue under El Capitan to Spotlight indexing. They’ve tested whether that was the cause by removing the mounted drive from Spotlight, and then they are able to unmount it. (Open the Spotlight preference pane, click the Privacy tab, and drag the volume into the “Prevent Spotlight from searching these locations” area.)
    Failing that, logging out of your OS X account and back in should clear the state, allowing you to unmount it. And if that doesn’t work, a full restart should help.
    I’ve discovered in El Capitan, unfortunately, that even in 10.11.4 it retains a few bugs that degrade the experience until rebooted, notably the “items disappear from my sidebar” bug. I documented it back in November 2015, and subsequent release of El Capitan (10.11.2, .3, and .4) seemed to reduce the frequency with which it occurs. But I have heard from readers that they are still seeing this disappearance as well.
    Because some sidebar items derive from Spotlight searches, it’s possible that Spotlight is the culprit behind both disk unmount and the temporary loss of sidebar items.
    If you want to dive down into the command-line level, launch Applications > Utilities > Terminal, and type precisely:
    lsof | grep "/Volumes"
      The “list all open files” (lsof) command combined with grep to filter lets you see all open files on attached drives.
    The lsof command is short for “list open files,” and sending the results via a pipe | to the grep pattern-recognition command and using /Volumes as the match shows only open files related to items on externally mounted drives. You can look through this list of files, and see if there’s a frozen program or something you need to uninstall that you didn’t realize was active.
    from: 
    http://www.macworld.com/article/3061175/os-x/what-to-do-when-a-hard-drive-wont-unmount-in-os-x-el-capitan.html

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