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TpwUK

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  1. Like
    TpwUK reacted to c.frio for an article, Clear Mac App Store Temp Cache to Fix Some Download Issues   
    Sometimes simply deleting the app in question can resolve any surrounding difficultly, but on some occasions that isn’t possible or isn’t effective. These type of unusual errors can typically be resolved by manually clearing out the Mac App Store cache, and then re-downloading the app, or re-visiting the Mac App Store. This tutorial will walk through completing that process.
     
    Accessing the Mac App Store Temporary Download Caches
    Be sure to backup your Mac before beginning this process, it’s unlikely something will go wrong if you follow the instructions but because you are editing a system level cache directory it’s always good practice to backup and be sure your data is safe. Don’t skip backing up. 
    open $TMPDIR../C/com.apple.appstore/


    Quit out of the Mac App Store Open the Terminal, found in /Applications/Utilities/ and type the following command exactly: Hit Return and the com.apple.applestore folder will open in the Finder of Mac OS Move the contents of this folder onto the desktop of the Mac (or if you are confident, move the contained temporary data into the Trash) Importantly, do not delete or adjust any other files outside of this directory, when finished close the com.apple.applestore folder Relaunch Mac App Store Now you should be able to download or re-download the apps or Mac OS installer files again, and they should work properly as intended.
    This process can help if you’re unable to download something from the Mac App Store, if it’s showing up erroneously as downloaded when it’s not, or if there are constant verification errors or other problems with the downloaded app or installer file. For example, you may need to do this if you notice that the Mac App Store is persistently showing a Mac OS installer as “Downloaded” despite not having completed the download as discussed in this Sierra troubleshooting detail. If you delete the temp cache data, it will allow you to re-download that Mac OS installer again in such a situation. 
    This troubleshooting trick will not resolve user level cache issues with the App Store, which are typically superficial behavior like the App Store not loading pages or behaving in an inordinately slow manner. 
    For those wondering about alternatives that do not involve the command line, you can also approach this temp cache directory through the Mac App Store “Debug” menu, but the latest versions of Mac OS and Mac App Store do not seem to support the current defaults write command to reveal the option. If you happen to know an updated defaults string that works with modern Mac OS releases, be sure to leave a comment. 
        from: http://osxdaily.com/2016/10/08/mac-app-store-temp-cache-folder/
  2. Like
    TpwUK reacted to c.frio for an article, How to use Caps Locks in macOS Sierra to switch between keyboards that use different characters   
    Twitter buddy Michael Fessler alerted Mac 911 to a great help for those who frequently type in keyboards for two different character sets, like Latin and Hebrew, Chinese, Arabic, and many others. You can make a quick-switch option from the keyboard without resorting to a menu, by turning a tap of the Caps Lock key into a keyboard swap.
    The option appears in the Keyboard system preference pane in the Input Sources tab. It has a lot of explanation: “Use the Caps Lock key to switch to and from U.S. Press and hold to enable typing in all uppercase.”
      This won’t appear when you have two keyboards that use the same basic underlying set of characters. That may be confusing, because, for instance, you can add a French keyboard that uses a different layout, like AZERTY, and it’s not an option. Both the U.S. and French keyboards derive characters from the same Latin set.
    Pick a non-Latin keyboard, and the option appears. If you have multiple non-Latin keyboards, the first one you added is the only one that Caps Lock swaps between. If you add more and then delete the first or more, the most recently added or the last one remaining becomes the swappable keyboard.

    The Keyboard preference pane now lets you set a simpler way to swap for certain keyboards.
    This doesn’t work for all non-U.S. layouts, however. If you add Japanese, as my friend Matthew Amster-Burton did, the checkbox doesn’t appear. That’s because macOS’s default input method for Japanese is Hiragana, which relies on the underlying roman syllables, according to Matthew.
    You can seemingly predict this: if the keyboard preview in the preference pane shows Latin (or “Western”) characters, the keyboard option doesn’t appear; if the preview shows non-Latin characters, it does.
    from:  http://www.macworld.com/article/3123735/macs/how-to-use-cap-locks-in-macos-sierra-to-switch-between-keyboards-that-use-different-characters.html
  3. Like
    TpwUK reacted to c.frio for an article, How to Trigger an Alert Dialog Pop-Up from Command Line in Mac OS   
    Let’s review how advanced Mac users can trigger alert dialog boxes in the MacOS GUI from the command line. You can choose to specify a specification application to trigger the pop-up alert to appear within, or, perhaps better yet, trigger a alert dialog in whatever the foremost application in Mac OS X is.

    And yes this works in every version of macOS or Mac OS X that has existed, so there shouldn’t be any compatibility issues here.
    How to Make a Dialog Alert Pop-Up in Mac OS
    Perhaps the most useful dialog alert is one that is visible from anywhere and is thus sent to whatever is the foremost application. This insures the alert box isn’t missed.
    The syntax to trigger a dialog alert box in the frontmost application on the Mac is as follows:
    osascript -e 'tell application (path to frontmost application as text) to display dialog "Hello from osxdaily.com" buttons {"OK"} with icon stop'
    The resulting pop-up alert box looks like this:

    For example, you could use this to trigger a dialog box in the frontmost application when a task at the command line has completed. Let’s say we’re running a python script and want an alert box to notify us when it has completed, the syntax for such a use case could look like the following:
    python MagicScript.py && osascript -e 'tell application (path to frontmost application as text) to display dialog "The script has completed" buttons {"OK"} with icon caution'
    That example would trigger a dialog box that says “The script has completed” with the yellow caution icon to the frontmost application in Mac OS X GUI after python has finished running ‘MagicScript.py’. You can pick other icons like stop, note, caution, or even specify a path to a custom icon if desired.
    While you can specify an application, System Events, or SystemUIServer, choosing the broader frontmost application allows the alert dialog window to appear onscreen no matter what application is at the forefront. Let’s cover triggering dialog alerts into specific apps, since that may be desirable as well. 
    Trigger a Dialog Alert in Specific Application
    To send a dialog or alert into a specific application, simply specify the app name in question, like so:
    Triggering an alert dialog in Mac OS Finder by way of command line:
    osascript -e 'tell app "Finder" to display dialog "Hello from osxdaily.com"'
    Triggering an alert dialog in Terminal app via command line:
    osascript -e 'tell app "Terminal" to display dialog "Hello from osxdaily.com"'
    Triggering an alert dialog in Safari via command line:
    osascript -e 'tell app "Safari" to display dialog "Hello from osxdaily.com"'
    Trigger an alert dialog to System Events by way of command line:
    osascript -e 'tell app "System Events" to display dialog "Howdy Doo"'
    You can specify any application to send the alert to this way, but for many of us the broader frontmost or System Events are likely the more useful choice.
    If a general pop-up dialog trigger is too intrusive, you might appreciate sending alerts to the Notification Center on Mac with terminal-notifier, terminal-notifier is a third party solution that allows command line messages to appear in the general Notifications Center of Mac OS. An even less invasive option would be to trigger a notification badge onto the Terminal Dock icon though that may be too subtle for many users needs.
    Anyway, this is a basic overview of triggering visual alert dialogs into the graphical interface of Mac OS by way of the command line. You can go much deeper than this if desired through more complex uses of AppleScript and osascript including having interactions with the dialog box impact what happens next, but that’s approaching a more complex topic which would be better served in it’s own article. Users who are interested in learning more about scripting with AppleScript can review the documentation included with the Script Editor app which is quite thorough and detailed.
    Have any interesting ways to use this tip, or know of another method to trigger dialog boxes into the GUI of Mac OS from the command line? Let us know in the comments.
        from:http://osxdaily.com/2016/09/06/trigger-alert-dialog-mac-via-command-line/
  4. Like
    TpwUK reacted to c.frio for an article, Fixing Wi-Fi “Connection Timeout Occurred” Errors on Mac OS X   
    If you see that error message, you should be able to resolve the connection timeout issue by following the steps outlined below.

    The troubleshooting steps covered here apply to any and all Macs using nearly any version of Mac OS X, whether it’s on a MacBook, MacBook Pro, iMac, Mac Mini, Air, or whatever else you’re using. Note you’re going not be removing wireless networking preferences as part of this sequence, that alone can reliably resolve stubbornly problematic wi-fi issues, but you will lose customizations to wireless settings in the process, so if you set custom DNS or specific DHCP or TCP/IP settings, be prepared to make those changes again.
    How to Resolve Mac “Connection Timeout” Error Messages with Wi-Fi Networks
    Before anything else, you should reboot the wi-fi router that is having a hard time connecting. Sometimes just turning a router off and back on again is sufficient to resolve connection difficulties.



    /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/
    com.apple.airport.preferences.plist
    com.apple.airport.preferences.plist-new

    com.apple.network.identification.plist

    NetworkInterfaces.plist
    
preferences.plist



    Turn off wi-fi on the Mac by going to the wireless menu and choosing “Turn Wi-Fi Off” Eject and disconnect any Thunderbolt or USB drives or disk peripherals that are attached to the computer (I know this sounds weird, just do it) Next to to the Finder in Mac OS X and create a new folder, call it something like “backup Wi-Fi files” so that it’s easy to identify and put it on the Desktop or another easy to access location Open a new Finder window, then hit Command+Shift+G to bring up “Go To Folder” (you can also access this from the Go menu), entering the following path: Select the following files in this directory, and copy them to the “backup Wi-Fi files” folder you made in the third step by using drag and drop: Back at the “SystemConfiguration” folder with the aforementioned files selected, delete those files by dragging them to the Trash (you will need to authenticate to make this change) Now reboot the Mac as usual by going to the  Apple menu and choosing “Restart” When the Mac boots back up, go to  Apple menu and choose “System Preferences” and select the “Network” preference panel Choose ‘Wi-Fi’ from the side menu, and click the “Turn Wi-Fi On” button, then pull down the “Locations” menu and choose “Edit Locations” Click on the + plus button to create a new network location, name it something obvious, then click “Done” and using the Network Name menu item choose to join the wi-fi network as usual Authenticate and login to the router as usual, the wifi network connection should establish without incident and without a connection timeout error Close out of System Preferences (Choose Apply when asked about network settings) and enjoy your wi-fi connection
    Once you have established a wi-fi connection, you can reconnect any USB drives, Thunderbolt drives, USB flash disks, or other peripherals back to the Mac again – why this sometimes impacts wi-fi connections is unclear but for whatever reason, perhaps due to a bug, disconnecting them as part of the sequence usually resolves any connection failed and connection timeout issues. 
    After the wireless connection is shown to be working as intended, you can trash the ‘backup Wi-Fi files’ folder that was created in this process – the reason we kept those is so that if there is a problem and things are somehow worse (which is incredibly unlikely), you can quickly swap the files back into place again and at least return to the prior point. Of course if you regularly back up your Mac like you should with Time Machine, that’s less of a necessity, but it’s still good practice.
    Did this resolve your Mac connection timeout problems? Do you have another trick to fix the issue? Let us know in the comments below.
    from: http://osxdaily.com/2016/05/14/fix-wifi-connection-timeout-error-mac/
  5. Like
    TpwUK reacted to c.frio for an article, How to Secure Erase Free Space on Mac Drives with OS X El Capitan   
    For those wondering, these features were removed from the modern version of Disk Utility in Mac OS X because they do not work on SSD volumes, which are becoming more commonplace and nearly all Mac laptops ship with them by default now. But not everyone has an SSD drive, and thus some users may still wish to perform a secure erase of free space on their Mac hard disk. To achieve the same secure erase in modern versions of Mac OS X you’ll need to turn to the command line. And yes, this works to erase free space on older versions of Mac OS X too, but since they can do the same task with Disk Utility it’s perhaps a bit less relevant to the prior releases. 

    This is for advanced Mac users only who are comfortable with backing up their Mac, using the command line with exact syntax, and the concepts behind permanently removing data. To be perfectly clear, this secure erases only the free space on a drive, aimed at preventing file recovery efforts, it does not perform a secure erase of the entire hard drive as described here.
    How to Secure Erase Free Space on Mac OS X El Capitan Drives via Command Line, Without Disk Utility
    Back up your Mac before attempting to use these commands. The command line requires precise syntax and is unforgiving, improper commands could lead to the unintended removal of data you do not want to delete, permanently, as this is a secure erase function. You have been warned, so backup your Mac data first, then proceed at your own risk. 
    To get started, launch the Terminal (found in /Applications/Utilities/) and use the following general syntax, replacing level and drive name as appropriate:
    diskutil secureErase freespace (level 0-4) /Volumes/(Drive Name)
    (level 0-4) is a number indicating the number of passes to write to the free space, ‘freespace’ indicates you are erasing only the free space and not the entire drive itself – a critically important difference – and (Drive Name) is self explanatory. Users can also choose the disk identifier if desired. If you aren’t sure of the name of the drive, using diskutil list will show you all mounted drives and partitions. If the drive in question has a space in the name, you should place it in quotes or escape it with backslashes.
    For example, to perform a secure erase with 35 passes on free space on a drive named “Macintosh HD” you could use the following command string:
    diskutil secureErase freespace 3 "/Volumes/Macintosh HD"
    Hitting return will instantly begin the secure erase of any free space. This is irreversible, so as we’ve mentioned a dozen times already, be sure the syntax is exact.

    The manual page entry on diskutil offers the following details on the secure erase feature, detailing the level of writing over free space.
    That’s all there is to it, and this is how you can continue to erase free disk space on a Mac running OS X El Capitan or later with the newly limited Disk Utility. Another option is to use an old version of Disk Utility in modern versions of Mac OS X, either from a boot drive or recovery mode, of an older Mac OS release, or with the application itself, but that is generally not recommended.
    And yes, this works on both standard hard disk drives with spinning platters, and modern SSD disks, though with an SSD drive the feature is less relevant as TRIM / garbage collection should handle the file removal on it’s own. For SSD volumes, a better option is to enable and use FileVault disk encryption on the Mac, which encrypts data on the drive making it unrecoverable without the FileVault key, thus obviating the need to securely erase free space on the volume.
    Know of any other helpful secure data removal tips or tricks, or another way to securely erase your free disk space in modern versions of Mac OS X? Let us know in the comments. 
        from:http://osxdaily.com/2016/04/28/erase-free-space-mac-command-line/
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