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dunecase

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dunecase last won the day on February 1 2016

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  1. dunecase

    Dune Case - Q&A With Alexander Gomez

    Thanks for you comments Rory.. Let me say thank you for your interest and I hope through this thread I can help others understand what Dune Case is and what sets us apart from other cases makers. Firstly I would like to mention that the Dune Case is just a case, not a computer with customize parts, special heat sink and thermal dynamics. However when building the Dune case, we refined our design to support mini ITX components. This was the most challenging part. Using industry standard components to work inside a cylindrical design. It took nearly one year and four prototypes to do this. And at every stage of completing a prototype we tested, analysed and improved the case design for the next prototype. We optimized it four times and I was satisfy with the last prototype and it is now ready for production. Prior art exists for cylindrical cases designs pre-2013. "FIC Piston" did a wonderful job of creating a computer in a cylindrical design and it has inspired others to do the same. Other manufactures that have done designs in a cylindrical shape. Also there is prior art of cylindrical designs before 2013 and not just in the PC industry. When looking at the design of the Dune case it is very unique and there is nothing like it in the PC case market. The thick high grade aluminum in a cylindrical design with a mesh on top is just the beginning. Were we set our selves apart is inside the case. We have a unique PSU bracket that splits the airflow into two chambers; CPU and GPU. The PSU bracket isolates air and ensures that air sourced from the vents on the bottom of the case flows into the right direction. Also the Dune Case has a very unique door design that is a GPU mount. Open the door and it gives you access to the HDD mounts and cable management. This is a first that I have seen. I have seen compartments similar but not as a door that is also a GPU mount. And on top we have a 140mm high quality fan that works with this design and pulls the hot air out of the case. In regards to funding we are already at just under 60K USD as we speak and we have 3 more weeks to reach our goal. I am fully confident that we are going to be funded. Also there is life after Kickstarter and I plan to make quality PC cases with high grade materials and simplistic designs moving forward. Dune Case is really the first case I design from the ground up. While a cylindrical design's have existed for a very long time, the Dune Case is taking a new approach on the PC case designs. I will also attach my story of how I built this PC and please ask any questions .. I'm here to listen to the community and want to here what you have to say about Dune Case .. Thanks for reading, Alexander Gomez --------------------------------------------------------------- About a year ago, I took a bunch of standard PC components, and built a cylindrical case around it. I considered where to put the MOBO/GPU/CPU and cables; I thought about thermals and ease of accessibility. I even went so far as to have my friend CAD design a prototype, mill the aluminium, and build a case. Only, it didn’t meet my one directive – a case that was more appliance than cable monster. Stage 1: Prototype 1 (Standard PC Parts) - January 2015 Parts: · Silverstone 450W SFX PSU Gold · MSI 780 GTX Gaming · MSI ITX motherboard · 16 GB Ram · 500 GB 2.5 inch Segate HDD · intel i7 4770k CPU We measured each part, loaded them into CAD and milled the aluminium. The process took a long time. Biggest challenge was to remove visible lines from the top of the case; which we overcame using a combination of methods. We then installed the parts in the case and stress tested it using Prime95. The result: we needed a fan to aid airflow; we needed a better way to manage cables. Stage 2: Prototype 2 (Fine Tune) - April 2015 Parts: Same as Prototype 1 plus a new 140mm Thermalright fan I took the outer case we built and redesigned the inside. I used a 3D printer to do the front panel, and painted it gold. I then installed a 140mm fan on top of the case and noticed an immediate improvement in internal temps. Hot air naturally rises; a fan at the top pulling it upward accelerated the natural process – hot air was coming out quicker. But, I still wasn’t happy. The case was too tall and didn’t look right. While it was nice to have a full size GPU, more powerful mini-ITX cards (like the 970 GTX) were coming out and it was time to integrate them into my thinking. Stage 3: Prototype 3 (Making it shorter) - June 2015 Parts: Same as Prototype 2 but removed 780 GTX and replaced it with mini ITX 970 GTX I reached back out to my CAD buddy and asked him to recalculate every part. While he was doing that, I had an idea for managing the cables. What if we mounted the GPU on to a door, so when you open the door you have access to everything else – HDD, cables for power and SATA? It changed everything. The inside of the case became so much more appealing! As far as I know, no other case has this feature. We had another go at the design and once we finished another prototype, I was finally satisfied. Stage 4: Final Version - September 2015 Parts: Same as Prototype 3 We did a quick 3D print of most of the parts and CNC’d a new case and bottom. I asked my buddy to make the door’s contour match the round top. We sanded down all the parts and put it all together. The result was amazing. We continued to tweak the internal design – creating a special container for the power supply which helps direct the air from the bottom, leaving no place for hot spots. Next step – create a polished version that we would paint, assemble and test. Stage 5: Final Version Part 2 - October 2015 Now that we had a working version we all liked, we needed to recreate it with precision. After a year of design, redesign, testing, tweaking, and modifying, Dune Case is here. I love the design and that I can customize it how I want with mini-ITX components. It’s upgradeable, and the premium quality materials we used (high-grade aluminum, electronic paint finish) give it the look I set out for – an aesthetically pleasing computer case that’s as comfortable in a living room as a gaming system or in an office as a workstation. This project has been a labor of love, and I’m very grateful for all the support I’ve received throughout the process. Alexander Gomez
  2. dunecase

    MacPro (Late 2013) mini-ITX case mod

    Hey there ... we are using a SFX power supply. We we put it together me used a Silverstone SFX PSU
  3. dunecase

    MacPro (Late 2013) mini-ITX case mod

    yes.. this case was built with using the industry standard parts. we used the standard and found a way to put this all in the case. You will not need any special tools or mounts / connectors to install into this case. The standard we use is the mini ITX standard for mobo and gpu. The HDD is 2.5 inch and power supply is SFX standard. The GPU mounts to a door. When opening the door you will have access to the Hard drives and cables. I Hope that helps
  4. dunecase

    MacPro (Late 2013) mini-ITX case mod

    when building the first version we tried to use less fans as possible as we wanted it to be a quiet case. The temps were ok but we wanted it to be cooler than the average case. I decided to put a 140mm fan on top of the case that was quiet. that lowered the temps quite a bit and the fans were not under stress. Because the case is round and hot air naturally rises the rate of air flowing out of the case was faster than conventional case (box - air flow is horizontal)... I hope that answers your question...
  5. dunecase

    MacPro (Late 2013) mini-ITX case mod

    hey mate .. good to hear from an aussie .. This build accomidates for standard SFX powersupply. In my case I used a Silverstone SFX 450W Gold certified PSU. Can it be used in Australia .. sure can
  6. I built a cylindrical case with high grade aluminium that accommodates standard mini-ITX parts. We factored in thermals, cable management, and small form factor design. Please see my other forum on how I built it. http://www.osx86.net/forums/topic/23990-building-a-macpro-late-2013-case-cylinder/ Alex
  7. Nearly a year ago, we started to build a case that was cylindrical in design that could be used with standard PC parts. It was a challenge to get all the parts inside the cylindrical case as it is not a box. We considered thermals, cable management, positioning of mobo / gpu / psu, and the ease of accessibility of parts. We used all the industry standards for PC parts and built around that. Today, I finally have come up with a design and I hope it will help others to that are looking for a similar solution that is well thought and complete. Here are some of the picture of the final product: Stage 1: Prototype 1 (Standard PC Parts) - January 2015 Parts: · Silverstone 450W SFX PSU Gold · MSI 780 GTX Gaming · MSI ITX motherboard · 16 GB Ram · 500 GB 2.5 inch Segate HDD · intel i7 4770k CPU We started to look at all these parts and measured them piece by piece. I had a friend who is a CAD designer and he helped me with drawing all this up in CAD ... Thanks buddy ... After drawing the CAD it was time to have these parts CNC out of aluminum ... it took forever to mill out the metal.. and very costly .. but in the end it was worth it. The most challenging part was to have a case that didn't have lines on the top of the case that was visible. We managed to do that with a combination of different methods. At the end of the process of cutting the metal, we put all the parts in. It looked great, but after looking at it for 5 minutes something didn't feel right.. The parts felt unorganized and cables were coming from everywhere. There was no cable management. Parts where not easy to put in and out. We stress test it with the case closed using Prime95, and decided that we need a fan to help aid the airflow. Stage 2: Prototype 2 (Fine Tune) - April 2015 Parts: Same as Prototype 1 plus a new 140mm Thermalright fan Three months later we used the existing outer case and redesign the inside. We 3D printed the front panel and gave it a paint job in bling bling gold. Also we included a 140mm fan on top of the case. Temps dropped and was quite cool inside the case. The fan on top pulling the air our of the case made a difference. Hot air naturally rises so the rate of hot air coming out was quicker. Putting it all together and analyzing it, I was still not satisfied and decided as much as I wanted a full size GPU in the case, more powerful cards were coming out in mini-ITX like the 970 GTX. I felt the case was too tall and it didn't look right. Stage 3: Prototype 3 (Making it shorter) - June 2015 Parts: Same as Prototype 2 but removed 780 GTX and replaced it with mini ITX 970 GTX I called my buddy the CAD guru to come over and asked him to recalculate every part and try to make this case smaller. During this process I came up with an idea that made the cables easier to manage. It was to mount the GPU on to a door and when you open the door you have access to HDD and cables for power and SATA. It changed everything !!!! It made inside the case look more appealing instead of seeing cables everywhere. Actually I have never seen this in any other case. We had another go at it and once we finished doing a quick prototype I was finally satisfied. Stage 4: Final Version - September 2015 Parts: Same as Prototype 3 We did a quick 3D print of most of the parts and CNC a new case and bottom. In the process I asked my buddy to make the door follow the contour of the round top. We sand down all the parts and put it all together. The result was amazing. We final made a version that was pleasing to the eye inside out, fix the problems with the thermal and cable management. Also we created a special container for the power supple which helps direct the air from the bottom into the right area leaving no place for hot spots. Now it was time to create a polished version painted, assembled, and tested. Stage 5: Final Version Part 2 - October 2015 Now we had a workable version we all liked, the next step was to recreate it with precision. The result was amazing. After a year on working on this case it has finally become a reality. I love the design and the fact I can put my own parts in it. I like the fact that I can keep upgrading it and most of all we used very high quality materials to build it using high grade aluminum and electronically painted it titanium grey and gold. I put a lot of hard work into this and thank everyone that helped me. You can see all progress on my case at: http://www.dunecase.com Thanks for reading. If your interested in more details, I am happy to share my experience. Alexander Gomez
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